Arnold & Son Steel DSTB Hands On

Arnold & Son DSTB Steel

Mechanical complexity, architectural beauty, killer good looks, the DSTB from Arnold & Son really has it all. Part of the brand’s highly regarded Instrument Collection, the DSTB encapsulates just about everything we love about the brand. To find out why, you’ll just have to read on.

The DSTB

Right now those not familiar with the aforementioned English-inspired, Swiss watch manufacturer are probably thinking “the watch looks amazing, but what the heck is a DSTB?” I am glad you asked. DSTB simply stands for Dial Side True Beat, although as is always the case with Arnold & Son, it is anything but simple.

Nowhere are its inner workings more visible however than in the DSTB, where it has literally been made the point of focus of the entire watch.

Although not as complicated as some of its siblings – like the Constant Force Tourbillon we got hands on with here last month – the DSTB manages to capture our attention and imagination by taking a complex mechanism that is usually hidden away at the back of the watch and distilling it down into its purest form so that the wearer can fully appreciate its true beauty.

Arnold & Son DSTB Steel

In this instance, the ‘complex mechanism’ I am referring to of course is the true beat seconds complication, which is incorporated into a number of watches created by Arnold & Son. Nowhere are its inner workings more visible however than in the DSTB, where it has literally been made the point of focus of the entire watch.

As an added touch the lever is shaped like an anchor, a nod to the maritime achievements of the brand’s namesake John Arnold.

Before we go on any further though, I should probably just clarify what a true beats second complication is, in case anyone is unfamiliar with the term. Also known as a dead beat seconds, the true beat complication is all about increasing accuracy for the wearer. Essentially the True Beat escapement measures out time in complete one-second steps rather than the fractions determined by the balance frequency. As a result the seconds hand ticks its way around the dial, much like that of a quartz watch, instead of sweeping, allowing the user to precisely count the seconds as they pass. Pretty cool right?

Normally though, as I mentioned before, you don’t actually get to see the true beat mechanism. You only get to see the result, which is the ticking seconds hand. By exploding out the complication however and putting it on the dial side, Arnold & Son has taken something relatively unremarkable and turned it into a miniature work of mechanical art.

Arnold & Son DSTB Steel

On display, in addition to the hands of course, is the lever, wheels and three palladium treated bridges, all beautifully arranged for maximum visibility and appreciation by the wearer. As an added touch the lever is shaped like an anchor, a nod to the maritime achievements of the brand’s namesake John Arnold.

The true beat seconds themselves are indicated via a large sapphire dial that occupies the top left portion of the dial at 11 o’clock. At the 4 o’clock position, a silvery opaline subdial indicates the hours and the minutes via blued hands. The visible dial plate of the DSTB meanwhile is black ADLC treated with large circular finishing, and screws with bevelled and mirror-polished heads

…this edition of the DSTB is limited in its production, with just 250 examples being produced and will cost you less than you think.

Making it all possible is the self-winding calibre A&S6003, an in-house movement comprised of 229 components created specifically for DSTB. In true Arnold & Son style, the NAC grey treated movement features Haute Horlogerie finishing with hand-chamfered and satin-finished lever and bridges, polished edges and fine circular graining and Côtes de Genève rayonnantes.

Arnold & Son DSTB Steel

Presented in a 43.5 mm stainless steel case that wears very nicely on the wrist, the DSTB of course features a sapphire caseback for viewing the beautifully finished movement, complete with skeletonised oscillating weight. As with most Arnold & Son timepieces this edition of the DSTB is limited in its production, with just 250 examples being produced and will cost you less than you think.

Check out www.arnoldandson.com for more details.

Tom Mulraney
Founder & Editor
Tom likes to write about luxury watches. So much so, that he created The Watch Lounge just so he would have an outlet for his passion. Together with his team, he is dedicated to bringing you original, entertaining (and maybe even a little educational) luxury watch and lifestyle content.

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